Stetson felt Hats
Austral 4X Buffalo Bat Masterson 4X Buffalo Cavalry 5X premium fur felt
• Buffalo Fur Felt
• Durable and water repellent
• 4 1/2" Regular oval crown, Profile 55
• 3 1/2” bound edge brim
• Grosgrain ribbon band
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Bark
• Buffalo Fur Felt
• Durable and water repellent
• 5 1/2" Regular oval crown, Profile 53
• 3 1/4” bound edge brim
• Grosgrain ribbon band
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Black
• 5X premium fur felt
• 4 1/4” Crown
• Regular Oval
• Profile 32
• 3” Brim
• Grosgrain ribbon band with leather band and chin strap
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Black
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or
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call 360-569-0979
or
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 $150.00 $150.00 $220.00
Diamante 1000X Diamond Jim 5X Fur Felt Lariat 5X Beaver
• 1000X Premium Chinchilla/Beaver fur
• Available in a 4 5/8” Cattleman profile 48 or 5" Cattleman profile 01
• Available 3 1/2" or 4” brim
• Self matching band with 14K gold buckle & 26 Genuine Diamonds
• Satin lining
• Tooled Leather hat
• 5X Fur Felt
• 4 1/4" crown, Pinch front profile 16
• 3 1/4" brim
• Woven leather band
• Comfort sweatband
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Black
• 5X Beaver
• 4" Brim
• 4 1/4" Regular Oval Crown, Cattleman Profile 72
• Self Matching Band
• 3 Piece Western Buckle Set
• Satin Lining
• Available in Black, Bone, Chocolate, Stone and White
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or
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$5,000.00 $205.00 Black $205.00
Oakridge 3X wool Open Road 6X fur felt
• 3X Wool
• 4" Brim
• 4 5/8" Regular Oval Crown, Cattleman Profile 772
• Self Matching Band
• 3 Piece Western Buckle Set
• Satin Lining
• Available in Black, Bone, Chocolate, Stone and White
• 6X fur felt
• 4" Regular oval crown, Cattleman profile 05
• 2 3/4" Bound Edge Brim
• Narrow grosgrain band
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Silver Belly & Black
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or
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bone $95.00 black $90.00 $220.00
Roper 6X Silver Belly Roper 6X Beaver Black Seminole

  • 4 5/8” Cattleman crown

  • 4” Brim

  • Also available in Silver, Grey

  • 4 5/8” Cattleman crown
  • 4” Brim
  • Also available in Chocolate and Acorn
  • 4X Buffalo Fur Felt

  • Water resistant

  • Gus Crown

  • 4” Brim

  • Color is ‘Mink’ (shown).

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or
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$234.00 $220.00 $130.00
Royal Flush Sheridan Tom Mix 6X fur felt
  • 5X Rabbit fur
  • 3 3/4” Gambler crown
  • 3 1/8 “ Brim
  • Concho leather hat band
  • Available in black
• Buffalo Fur Felt
• Durable and water repellent
• 5” Regular oval crown, Profile 52
• 4” Bound edge brim
• Grosgrain ribbon
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Black
• 6X fur
• 4 1/2" to 6 1/2" creased Gus crown profile 28
• 5" Bound edge brim
• Grosgrain ribbon band
• Stetson hat box
• Available in Black & Silver Belly
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or
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black $200.00 $150.00 black $255.00 - Silver Belly $275.00
Saxon Temple  
 
• Fur Blend
• 2" Brim
• Pinchfront
• Grosgrain ribbon band
• Available in Caribou, Cordova, Midnight, Black, Graphite, and Walnut
• Fur Blend
• 2 5/8" X 2 3/8" Brim
• Pinchfront
• Grosgrain ribbon band
• Available in Sage, Mink, Tawny, Caribou, Black and Navy
 
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$190.00 Black $195.00  

Stetson Straw Hats  ( below )

10X Grant Comfort
Pricing $110.00
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10X Eagle Pass
Pricing $110.00
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10X Carson Comfort
Pricing $110.00
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Retro
Pricing $58.95
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Airway
Pricing $64.95
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Brentano
Pricing $59.95
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STETSON VIDEO!

Click on the video (on the left) to watch a video about the making of Stetson Hats. It's really a great visual aid showing the entire process.



Stetson sets the standard in Hats — it practically means Hats. The brand embodies spirit of the West and is an icon of quality and style the World over. Because of its authentic and rich heritage, Stetson has and will always be a part of American history.

It was all started by a young American entrepreneur in the mid 1800’s named John B. Stetson and this is his story…

If there was one thing John B. Stetson hated, it was the patter of raindrops on his head. He knew the rain and East coast cold weather would make his tuberculosis worse. In 1859, on doctor’s advice, the 24 year-old John B. moved out West.

By the 1860’s, John B. was panning for gold in Colorado but found the rugged life made him sicker. When he was trapped in the mountains and threatened by sudden rainstorms and howling winds, ordinary clothing didn't keep him warm and dry. He knew he had to act fast to protect himself — or die — so he hurled himself into the task. He noticed how beavers’ pelts repelled water in streams, so he trapped a few and created a thick fur felt that he used to make a tent, which kept him warm and dry.

John B., who came from a family of Hat makers, then decided to try using the fur felt for a Hat. His father, who taught John B. how to make felt in the first place, also taught him that a big air pocket between the top of the head and the Hat s crown created a cushion of warm air that kept the head warm. Outdoor western living taught him that a Hat had to have a wide brim to keep out the elements. It also taught him that hauling water was vital on the frontier, so he made the inside lining of his Hat waterproof. This meant it could double as a water bucket if needed. (That’s how Stetson Hats got nicknamed the “10 gallon” Hats even though the original never held more than a half-gallon.) John B. pulled all these elements together in his design. The finished product had an unusual 6-inch high crown and a 7-inch brim. The first famous Stetson Hat had been born.

The industrious Mr. Stetson decided to manufacture and sell his Hat after a mule driver paid him a $5 gold piece for the Hat right off his head.

John B.’s success didn't happen overnight. In 1865, he returned to his native Philadelphia to open his first Hat factory. He only had $100 in capital so he rented a tiny room and bought tools and $10 worth of fur to make felt cloth. He was the sole employee.

But he wore his Hat everywhere, knowing it would spark interest. Within a year, he was adding workers and making Hats in quantity. Stetson paid close attention to details. He made sure people knew that he used only the best materials. The name “Stetson” was stamped with a long lasting 14-karat gold leaf on the inside hatband.

The Hats were a big hit in the thinly populated West, where taking a beating was a requirement for clothes (and for people). The Stetson was heavy enough to knock a man down in a fight. In a celebrated incident, a Stetson kept its shape after being hit by 20 bullets. The rugged individualism of the West was perfectly represented by a Hat that could be shaped differently by each wearer -- a punched-in crown, a bended brim, a braided leather band were all different ways for to make a Stetson one’s own.

Big-city Easterners scoffed at these Hats at first, unaware of their practicality. But Stetson didn’t give up. He knew that as sales grew, word would circulate about his product. He was right. Variations of the Hat eventually appealed to city slickers and to cowboys alike. It was a Hat for all seasons; it catered to whatever position in life you had — whether you were rich or poor, whether it was dress, work or play.

By 1886, Stetson owned the world’s biggest Hat factory in Philadelphia and employed nearly 4,000 workers. The factory was putting out about 2 million Hats a year by 1906. John B. transformed Hat making from a manual to a mechanized industry. He introduced iron cutting and shaping machines, improving quality control. He was also among the first U.S. tycoons to offer benefits to reward workers for hard work. He dispensed free health care to employees and gave shares in his company to valued workers. As a philanthropist, he founded Stetson University in Deland, Florida, and built a Philadelphia hospital.

The original Hat that John B. had named the “The Boss of the Plains” became the symbol of the American West and helped turn the cowboy into an American icon. In Hollywood films Stetsons became symbols of good (white Hats) and evil (black Hats). But in the end John B. was not alone concerned with making better Hats; he was interested equally in making better men.

("Etiquette," Emily Post, Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1922 and 1927)

Some of these tips may seem slightly outdated, but whether you are looking for the “proper” way to wear your Hat, or just want to read some interesting tidbits of Hat history, here are some guidelines from the mistress of etiquette, Emily Post.

WHEN A GENTLEMAN TAKES OFF HIS HAT

A gentleman takes off his Hat and holds it in his hand when a lady enters the elevator in which he is a passenger, but he puts it back on again in the corridor. A public corridor is like the street, but an elevator is suggestive of a room, and a gentleman does not keep his Hat on in the presence of ladies in a house.

This is the rule in elevators in hotels, clubs and apartments. In office buildings and stores the elevator is considered as public a place as the corridor. What is more, the elevators in such business structures are usually so crowded that the only room for a man's Hat is on his head.

When a gentleman stops to speak to a lady of his acquaintance in the street, he takes his Hat off with his left hand, leaving his right free to shake hands, or he takes it off with his right and transfers it to his left. If he has a stick, he puts his stick in his left hand, and gives her his right. If they walk ahead together, he puts his Hat on; but while he is standing in the street talking to her, he should remain Hatless. There is no rudeness greater than for him to stand talking to a lady with his Hat on, and a cigar or cigarette in his mouth.

WHEN A GENTLEMAN LIFTS HIS HAT

Lifting the Hat is a conventional gesture of politeness shown to strangers only, not to be confused with bowing, which is a gesture used to acquaintances and friends. In lifting his Hat, a gentleman merely lifts it slightly off his forehead and replaces it; he does not smile or bow, nor does he even look at the object of his courtesy. No gentleman ever subjects a lady to his scrutiny or his apparent observation.

If a lady drops her glove, a gentleman should pick it up, hurry ahead of her — on no account nudge her — offer the glove to her and say: “I think you dropped this!.” The lady replies: “Thank you.” The gentleman should then lift his Hat and turn away.

If he passes a lady in a narrow space, so that he blocks her way or in any manner obtrudes upon her, he lifts his Hat as he passes.

If he is on a street car which is very crowded, when he wishes to leave it and a lady is directly in his way, he asks: “May I get through, please?” As she makes room for him to pass, he lifts his Hat and says: “Thank you!”

If he is in the company of a lady anywhere in public, he lifts his Hat to a man who offers her a seat, or who picks up something she has dropped or shows her any other civility.

He lifts his Hat if he asks a woman or an old gentleman a question, and always, if, when walking on the street with either a lady or another man, his companion bows to another person.

In other words, a gentleman lifts his Hat whenever he says “Excuse me, Thank you,” or speaks to or is spoken to by a lady, or by an older gentleman. And no gentleman ever keeps a pipe, cigar or cigarette in his mouth when he lifts his Hat, takes it off, or bows.

THE INFORMAL BOW

In bowing on the street, a gentleman should never takes his Hat off with a flourish, nor should he sweep it down to his knee; nor is it graceful to bow by pulling the Hat over the face as though examining the lining. The correct bow, when wearing a high Hat, or derby, is to lift it by holding the brim directly in front, take it off merely high enough to escape the head easily, bring it a few inches forward, the back somewhat up, the front down, and put in on again. To a very old lady or gentleman, to show adequate respect, a sweeping bow is sometimes made by a somewhat exaggerated circular motion downward to perhaps the level of the waist, so that the Hat's position is upside down. If a man is wearing a soft Hat he takes it by the crown instead of the brim, lifts it slightly off his head and puts in on again.

AT THE OPERA, THE THEATER AND OTHER PUBLIC GATHERINGS

In walking about in the foyer of the opera house, a gentleman leaves his coat in the box — or in his orchestra chair — but he always wears his high Hat. The “collapsible” Hat is for use in the seats rather than in the boxes, but it can be worn perfectly well by a guest in the latter if he hasn’t a “silk” one.

If you have any modern day questions relating to etiquette wearing your Stetson, contact us and we’ll try to get you an answer pronto.
 

 
 
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Gear Up Northwest
PO Box 1723  -  Eatonville, Washington 98328

360-569-0979

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